The Munsters Episode 51: Underground Munster

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General Information

Director: Don Richardson

Writers: Joe Connelly and Bob Mosher

Cast: Fred Gwynne, Yvonne De Carlo, Al Lewis, Pat Priest, Butch Patrick, Warren Parker, John Mitchum, Buck Kartalian, Jimmy Joyce, Hoke Howell, Bob Harvey, Helen Kleeb, Elsie Baker, and J. Edward McKinley

Composer: Jack Marshall

Air Date: 12/16/1965

 

Overview

the-munsters-underground-munsterWhen Spot runs away from home, reports begin to surface of a giant lizard monster roaming the sewer system. Herman attempts to recover Spot, but is quickly assumed to be the monster’s mate.

By employing a confusion-themed premise (i.e. Herman wandering the sewer tunnels and being “mistaken” for a monster), “Underground Munster” will appeal to comedy enthusiasts. That being said, the terrified reactions of pedestrians are a tad overplayed.

 

Pros

For making elected officials look selfish, ridiculous, and apathetic, “Underground Munster” should be commended. For example, upon learning that “a verythe-munsters-underground-munster attractive young lady” wishes to speak with him, the sleazy Mayor Handley (J. Edward McKinley) agrees to meet with Marilyn and hopes that she will arrive in a bathing suit. In spite of this, the mayor promptly dismisses Marilyn and refuses to acknowledge her complaint, assuming that she was sent by an opponent in the upcoming election—an effective satire on politicians who care only about the acquisition of power; not about addressing the concerns or welfare of their constituents.

 

Cons

the-munsters-underground-munstersOstensibly driven by anarchistic motives, Grandpa invents a rigged voting machine in order to wipe out every officeholder in Mockingbird Heights. By allowing Herman to vote for candidates at random, however, Grandpa contradicts his initial plan to “vote against the whole ticket.”

Also problematic, three construction workers are shown to munch on fruit while breaking in a sewer. Even when suspending disbelief, viewers may have difficulty accepting that sanitation practices could be casually ignored to such a degree.

 

Analysis

Despite his early reluctance, Herman proves himself to be a loyal, dedicated family man by searching for Spot in the most revolting of locations—a length to which even many “normal” fathers would not likely go when retrieving a lost pet.

 

Concluding Comments

“Underground Munster” fails to make credible the foul, disgusting nature of a typical sewer system. Fans of The Munsters may nevertheless enjoy this episode, which serves as a testament to Herman’s devotion as a husband and father.

 

Overall Quality: 7/10

 

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The Munsters Episode 50: Will Success Spoil Herman Munster?

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General Information

Director: Ezra Stone

Writers: Lou Shaw, Joe Connelly, and Bob Mosher

Cast: Fred Gwynne, Yvonne De Carlo, Al Lewis, Pat Priest, Butch Patrick, Frank Evans, Nolan Leary, and Gary Owens

Composer: Jack Marshall

Air Date: 12/2/1965

 

Overview

Goofing around with a borrowed tape recorder, Herman creates a morbid rendition of “Dry Bones” (the song is later renamed to “That’s How Herman Was Born,” the-munsters-will-success-spoil-herman-munsteraccounting for references to neck bolts, spare body parts, and Dr. Frankenstein). Impressed with the cover, disc jockey Dick Willet (Gary Owens) decides to air Herman’s recording and offers a contract to the performer should he reveal himself. Herman gladly accepts the proposal, but soon realizes that fame often comes at a great personal cost.

For providing Fred Gwynne with an opportunity to showcase his rich, haunting voice, “Will Success Spoil Herman Munster?” should be commended. Observant fans will nevertheless note that Lou Shaw’s premise (i.e. Herman developing a gigantic ego from self-perceived stardom) is given a more humorous treatment in season one’s “Movie Star Munster.”

 

Pros

the-munsters-will-success-spoil-herman-munsterWhile enjoying dinner one evening, the Munsters react with disgust upon hearing Herman’s tune played on the radio (Grandpa even compares the anonymous singer to a werewolf with laryngitis). Though slightly overplayed, the family’s critical comments work to elicit amusing facial expressions from an embarrassed Herman.

 

Cons

(Spoilers beyond this point)

Determined to ruin the singing career of his son-in-law, Grandpa propels a “nuthin’ muffin” into Herman’s mouth. After swallowing Grandpa’s concoction, the-munsters-will-success-spoil-herman-munsterHerman discovers that his smooth, baritone voice has been replaced with that of a chipmunk. In addition to being extremely silly, the gag described above is hampered by a significant flaw: Grandpa, Lily, Marilyn, and Eddie never attempt to reason with Herman before taking such a drastic measure, causing them to appear selfish rather than concerned for the welfare of their patriarch. (The benevolent motives of Herman’s family are, however, made clear in a final, heartwarming scene.)

 

Analysis

the-munsters-will-success-spoil-herman-munsterInspired by the adage that pride goes before destruction, “Will Success Spoil Herman Munster?” contains a good morality lesson for viewers of all ages.

 

Concluding Comments

“Will Success Spoil Herman Munster?” is a cute, worthwhile episode of The Munsters. That being said, certain comedic devices (e.g. Herman’s King Kong impression) are too ridiculous even by the standards of this series.

 

Overall Quality: 7/10

 

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The Munsters Episode 49: Herman’s Driving Test

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General Information

Director: Ezra Stone

Writer: Dick Conway

Cast: Fred Gwynne, Yvonne De Carlo, Al Lewis, Pat Priest, Butch Patrick, Charlie Ruggles, Irwin Charone, and Francis De Sales

Composer: Jack Marshall

Air Date: 11/25/1965

 

Overview

In order to accept his promotion as a hearse driver, Herman must pass a standard driving test. When doing so proves difficult, Grandpa takes Hermanthe-munsters-hermans-driving-test to a rural DMV operated by Charlie Wiggins (Charles Ruggles)—an idiotic, visually impaired magistrate whose hijinks resemble those of Mr. Magoo.

By placing too little emphasis on the incompetent nature of its title character, “Herman’s Driving Test” fails to explore the full potential in Dick Conway’s premise. Fans of The Munsters will, however, appreciate Herman’s driving-course antics, brief though they may be.

 

Pros

the-munsters-hermans-driving-testIn one scene, Grandpa attempts to quiz Herman on the basics of driving etiquette. Fed up with Herman’s inability to answer straightforward questions, Grandpa creates an intersection diagram and requires his son-in-law (represented by an X) to react to a pedestrian (represented by an O). Naturally, Herman assumes that Grandpa has challenged him to a game of tic-tac-toe and responds accordingly—an effective jab at Herman’s lack of focus, understanding, and intuition when faced with difficult problems.

 

Cons

While taking his road test for the first time, Herman zooms around a track in fast motion. In addition to remaining unfazed by the reckless behavior ofthe-munsters-hermans-driving-test his student, the driving instructor (Irwin Charone) compels Herman to employ greater speed than before—a suggestion that makes no sense coming from an otherwise competent teacher.

Prior to entering the Groverville Courthouse, Grandpa advises Herman to keep his fingers crossed. Interpreting Grandpa’s advice in a literal fashion, Herman proceeds to contort his digits by force, causing the joints in his hand to audibly crunch while grinding together. A disgusting effect for a family-friendly show, Herman’s “finger-crossing” will induce cringing from those of a sensitive disposition.

 

Analysis

the-munsters-hermans-driving-testDespite bordering on hyperbolic, the determination displayed by Herman serves as a testament to his strength of character—much in contrast to the slothful, self-indulgent father figures featured in the majority of modern sitcoms.

 

Concluding Comments

“Herman’s Driving Test” is a mostly worthwhile episode of The Munsters. Especially amusing are the mishaps of Charlie Wiggins, which, though overplayed to the point of ridiculousness, will appeal to fans of small-town humor.

 

Overall Quality: 7/10

 

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The Twilight Zone Episode 54: The Odyssey of Flight 33

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General Information

Director: Justus Addiss

Writer: Rod Serling

Cast: John Anderson, Paul Comi, Sandy Kenyon, Wayne Heffley, Harp McGuire, Betty Garde, Beverly Brown, Nancy Rennick, Jay Overholts, and Lester Fletcher

Composer: None (Stock Music)

Air Date: 2/24/1961

Production Code: 173-3651

 

Overview

the-twilight-zone-the-odyssey-of-flight-33While en route from London to New York City, Global Airlines Flight 33 increases to a remarkable speed. Unable to diagnose and correct the problem, Captain Farver (John Anderson) and his crew find themselves unprepared for that which happens next.

A modern reimagining of the Flying Dutchman legend, “The Odyssey of Flight 33” generates intrigue from a simple, one-note premise. Fans of The Twilight Zone are therefore advised to view this classic episode, technical and budgetary limitations notwithstanding.

 

Pros

When the Boeing 707 enters a jet stream, a thick cloud layer is employed as if to exemplify the fear, paranoia, and uncertainty felt by passengers and experienced crew members alike—a subtle manner of suspense building that, around the halfway the-twilight-zone-the-odyssey-of-flight-33mark, culminates in an abrupt and thus effective twist (i.e. dinosaurs appearing along the Manhattan coastline, indicating that a temporal anomaly has just occurred).

Upon noticing modern structures in place of extinct animals, said passengers (and the audience) are lulled back into a sense of security; however, when additional (albeit less obvious) anachronisms are revealed in the following moments, Captain Farver and his navigators learn that familiar surroundings cannot always be trusted at face value. Possibly a commentary on the arrogance of man, the above scenario demonstrates how the mundane, innocuous, and ordinary aspects of our world can become dangerous when taken for granted.

 

Cons

the-twilight-zone-the-odyssey-of-flight-33Despite traveling millions of years into the past, Captain Farver has no difficulty identifying landmarks (e.g. Staten Island) that could not have existed as such during the Jurassic period.

 

Analysis

Though entirely fantastic, “The Odyssey of Flight 33” makes a compelling case that humans are subject to the whims of nature; not the other way around. Specifically, Captain Farver and his team of confident, seasoned flight technicians remain incapable of countering the fluke disturbance affecting their own aircraft—likely a statement on how even the most intelligent and skilled among us have little to offer when disaster strikes.

 

Concluding Comments

“The Odyssey of Flight 33” is yet another ominous, riveting, and atmospheric piece of experimental television. For time travel enthusiasts in particular, this episode is a must.

 

Overall Quality: 9/10

 

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The Munsters Episode 48: A Man for Marilyn

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General Information

Director: Ezra Stone

Writers: James Allardice and Tom Adair

Cast: Fred Gwynne, Yvonne De Carlo, Al Lewis, Pat Priest, Butch Patrick, Don Edmonds, Dick Wilson, Dave Willock, Jackie Coogan Jr., Jan Barthel, and Roger Perry

Composer: Jack Marshall

Air Date: 11/18/1965

 

Overview

Having frightened away Marliyn’s new love interest, Herman and Grandpa decide to turn a frog into a prince (Grandpa even selects a “nearsighted” frog tothe-munsters-a-man-for-marilyn avoid offending him with Marilyn’s appearance). Predictably, the experiment results in failure; however, Herman and Grandpa confuse Ted Bradley (Roger Perry)—a handsome, charming man—for the now escaped frog.

“A Man for Marilyn” is an amusing, if predictable, episode of The Munsters. Notably, a strong emphasis on confusion humor compensates for the one-note (albeit hilarious) gag at the core of this offering.

 

Pros

Upon arriving at 1313 Mockingbird Lane, Ted Bradley assumes that Marilyn—now trapped in her bedroom due to a doorknob mishap—is being held captive by an assortment of hideous, malevolent creatures. Herman and Grandpa, onthe-munsters-a-man-for-marilyn the other hand, mistake Ted for the myopic amphibian upon which they had experimented in a prior scene, prompting them to lock their young guest in a dungeon—a move that only serves to confirm Ted’s suspicion. The above scenario will no doubt appeal to fans of misunderstanding comedy, especially when coupled with Ted’s terrified responses to Herman and Grandpa, who, though normally courteous, speak to their prisoner as if addressing a pet frog.

 

Cons

(Spoilers beyond this point)

While investigating Ted’s fantastic tale of abduction, Officers Al (Dick Wilson) and Harry (Dave Willock) pay a visit to the Munsters. Believing themselvesthe-munsters-a-man-for-marilyn to be victims of an elaborate college prank, Al and Harry make a gracious and complimentary exit from Grandpa’s laboratory—an unlikely reaction from two policemen whose time had just been wasted.

 

Analysis

By going to extraordinary lengths to find (or create) a husband for Marilyn, Herman and Grandpa demonstrate a selfless love that would hardly be expected of Frankenstein’s monster and Count Dracula, respectively. It should be noted, however, that Herman expresses relief over finally “unloading” Marilyn, casting doubt on the benevolent nature of his intentions.

 

Concluding Comments

Though somewhat tired at this point in the series, the running joke featured most prominently in The Munsters (i.e. Herman and Grandpa scaring off one of Marilyn’s potential suitors, only to later blame the “ugliness” of their niece) is given a fresh and unique twist in “A Man for Marilyn.” Fans of absurd, kooky situations are therefore advised to view this episode.

 

Overall Quality: 9/10

 

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Tales from the Darkside Episode 43: A Choice of Dreams

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General Information

Director: Jerry Smith

Writer: James Houghton

Cast: Abe Vigoda, David Chandler, Ralph Monaco, David Glen, Tracy Kolis, Dominic Chianese, and Paul Sparer

Composer: Donald Rubinstein

Air Date: 5/4/1986

 

Overview

tales-from-the-darkside-a-choice-of-dreamsJake Corelli (Abe Vigoda), a vile mob boss with tremendous power over others, is diagnosed with terminal cancer. Thereafter, Corelli is approached by Michaelson (David Chandler)—an enigmatic scientist whose invention, Afterlife, allows the user to dream for all eternity; but at a harrowing price.

For effectively coupling science fiction devices with a mafia theme, “A Choice of Dreams” should be commended. Edward F. Shaver’s unique premise is, however, limited in scope by obvious budgetary constraints.

 

Pros

Though unintentionally humorous at times, “A Choice of Dreams” may appeal to fans of classic gangster movies. Especially worth praising is the performancetales-from-the-darkside-a-choice-of-dreams of Abe Vigoda (known for his portrayal of Tessio in The Godfather), whose sinister acting makes credible the fear, hatred, and pseudo-respect that Jake Corelli elicits from his victims. Audiences will immediately feel contempt for Corelli, who vows to ruin the career of a physician bold enough to speak his mind. Nevertheless, there are moments when Corelli, a man with a deeply troubled past, comes across as sympathetic—an aspect that allows the antagonist to appear human, layered, and three-dimensional despite being remarkably evil.

 

Cons

Played on a 1980s synthesizer, Donald Rubinstein’s cheap imitation of The Godfather score may elicit groaning from viewers.

 

Analysis

tales-from-the-darkside-a-choice-of-dreamsOperating on the notion that what goes around comes around, “A Choice of Dreams” delivers karmic justice in a simple yet satisfying manner.

 

Concluding Comments

“A Choice of Dreams” is an original, captivating, and underrated episode of Tales from the Darkside. That being said, the twist ending (clever though it may be) suffers from a campy execution.

 

Overall Quality: 8/10

 

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The Twilight Zone Episode 53: Twenty Two

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General Information

Director: Jack Smight

Writer: Rod Serling

Cast: Barbara Nichols, Jonathan Harris, Fredd Wayne, Arline Sax, Mary Adams, Norma Connolly, Wesley Lau, and Angus Duncan

Composer: None (Stock Music)

Air Date: 2/10/1961

Production Code: 173-3664

 

Overview

the-twilight-zone-twenty-twoWhile recovering from exhaustion, dancer Liz Powell (Barbara Nichols) has a recurring nightmare in which, upon visiting the hospital morgue, she encounters a frightening and unfamiliar nurse (Arline Sax). The next morning, Liz explains to her doctor (Jonathan Harris) just how realistic the dream was. In spite of his initial skepticism, the doctor begins to change his mind when Liz, a patient with no access to restricted areas of the hospital, recounts the room number (22) of the morgue.

“Twenty Two” is an ominous, low-budget episode of The Twilight Zone. Exceptionally commendable, the terrified reactions of Liz Powell make credible the foundation for Rod Serling’s narrative (i.e. a nightmare from which one cannot escape).

 

Pros

Though normally problematic, the use of videotape instead of traditional film works to the advantage of this episode. Notably, a surreal, dreamlike atmosphere the-twilight-zone-twenty-twostems from a low recording quality, thereby accentuating the nightmare sequences in a manner that could not have been achieved through conventional cinematography.

Also worth praising is the performance of Jonathan Harris, whose creepy laughter contributes to an already unpleasant situation. It should also be noted that the doctor played by Harris, incongruous and offensive though his manner may be, never comes across as campy or intrusive—much in contrast to the Lost in Space character of Dr. Smith, the role with which Harris is most commonly associated.

 

Cons

Despite explaining the nightmare showcased in a prior scene, the conversation involving the doctor, Liz Powell, and agent Barney Kamener (Fredd Wayne) drags on a tad longer than necessary.

 

Analysis

the-twilight-zone-twenty-twoBy employing physical devices, characters, and situations to embody an uncanny aspect of human intuition (i.e. the ability to sense when death is near), “Twenty Two” generates intrigue/terror from an otherwise simplistic, unremarkable concept. Especially haunting is the nurse portrayed by Arline Sax, who serves to warn the protagonist of impending doom; but does so in a vaguely sinister, not benevolent, fashion—a unique and disturbing twist on the premise originally explored in season one’s “The Hitch-Hiker.”

 

Concluding Comments

A vivid, chilling, and effective piece of experimental television, “Twenty Two” will appeal to fans of psychological horror. The tension that results from an eerie hospital setting is, however, interrupted by a slow-moving sequence filled with expository (albeit essential) dialogue.

 

Overall Quality: 9/10

 

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The Munsters Episode 47: John Doe Munster

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General Information

Director: Earl Bellamy

Writer: Richard Baer

Cast: Fred Gwynne, Yvonne De Carlo, Al Lewis, Pat Priest, Butch Patrick, Frank Maxwell, Willis Bouchey, Olan Soulé, Barry O’Hara, Peter Dawson, Joe Quinn, Michael Blake, and Monica Rush

Composer: Jack Marshall

Air Date: 11/11/1965

 

Overview

the-munsters-john-doe-munsterAfter a 300-lb safe lands on his head, Herman develops an unusual form of amnesia and regresses to the mentality of a young child. In order to retrieve Herman from state custody, Lily must adopt her husband and treat him like she would her own son. Unfortunately, Herman cannot keep from bickering with his “brother” Eddie.

Operating on the idiotic premise that a 7-foot tall, 150-year-old man would be given the legal status of a child, “John Doe Munster” will appeal to fans of the absurd comedy for which The Munsters is famous. That being said, Herman’s infantile behavior is a tad overplayed at times.

 

Pros

While presiding over Herman’s case, the Judge (Willis Bouchey) visibly struggles to maintain his composure—a humorous reaction coming from an otherwise dignified authority figure. For example, upon learning of Lily’s desire to adopt Herman, the Judge at first suspects that he may be the victim of a Candid Camera stunt. Then, afterthe-munsters-john-doe-munster realizing that Lily’s intentions are in fact genuine, the Judge agrees to grant the adoption on a “temporary trial basis” in case the Munsters decide that they’ve made a mistake.

In a bizarre effort to snap Herman out of his amnesia, Grandpa emulates the appearance of Rock Hudson (the actual disguise bears a stronger resemblance to Rudolph Valentino) and pretends to be madly in love with Lily. Though intended to make Herman jealous, the above scheme collapses when the goofy green giant, still trapped in a juvenile mental state, becomes more interested in playing with Grandpa’s whip than in protecting his wife from the advances of a strange man—an effective satire on the antics of inattentive, unobservant children.

 

Cons

Suspension of disbelief aside, Richard Baer’s concept for “John Doe Munster” fails to account for one significant problem: because Herman already conducts the-munsters-john-doe-munsterhimself in an age-inappropriate manner, the Munsters would likely fail to see any difference between the “adult” and “child” personalities of their patriarch.

 

Analysis

(Spoilers beyond this point)

When Eddie falls from a rooftop, Herman immediately reverts to his original, fatherly self and proceeds to rescue his son from danger. Contrived though it may be, the penultimate scene demonstrates that love, kindness, and parental devotion are essential to the Munster family.

 

Concluding Comments

“John Doe Munster” is a worthwhile, if excessively silly, episode. Especially commendable are Herman’s courtroom shenanigans, which create an amusing contrast with the straight performance of Willis Bouchey.

 

Overall Quality: 7/10

 

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Tales from the Darkside Episode 42: The Last Car

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General Information

Director: John Strysik

Writer: Michael McDowell

Cast: Begoña Plaza, Mary Carver, Louis Guss, Scooter Stevens, Bert Williams, and Paul Sparer

Composers: Ken Lauber and Kevin Maloney

Air Date: 2/23/1986

 

Overview

tales-from-the-darkside-the-last-carTraveling home for Thanksgiving, attractive college student Stacey (Begoña Plaza) boards a train occupied by an old man (Louis Guss), a little boy (Scooter Stevens), a conductor (Bert Williams), and the elderly Mrs. Crane (Mary Carver). Though initially optimistic, Stacey uncovers a harrowing truth about her surroundings.

A ghoulish episode, “The Last Car” will appeal to Tales from the Darkside fans of a morbid inclination. It should be noted, however, that the majority of questions raised in this episode are never answered in a logical or satisfactory manner.

 

Pros

Director John Strysik should be commended for crafting an ominous, albeit occasionally campy, fright show despite the limited resources with which he tales-from-the-darkside-the-last-carwas given to work. For example, nearly every scene occurs inside a single train car, thereby establishing and amplifying any claustrophobic undertones at the core of Michael McDowell’s teleplay. As the final act approaches, horror devices of a more overt and macabre nature (e.g. skeletons, flickering lights, and creepy synthesizer music) are employed in conjunction with the terrified reactions of Stacey—the perfect culmination of suspense in a low-budget setting.

 

Cons

By talking back to his elders and using toy guns to “shoot” people, the little boy hampers an otherwise eerie atmosphere with his annoying antics.

 

Analysis

tales-from-the-darkside-the-last-carSimilar to “The Hitch-Hiker” from The Twilight Zone, “The Last Car” serves as a metaphor on death itself. That being said, a lack of resolution in the final scene may lessen the impact of McDowell’s narrative thesis (i.e. the futility of resisting life’s only guaranteed outcome).

 

Concluding Comments

For viewers in search of a spooky entertainment piece to watch during Halloween season, “The Last Car” will not disappoint. As a commentary on human mortality, on the other hand, this offering leaves much to be desired.

 

Overall Quality: 7/10

 

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The Twilight Zone Episode 52: A Penny for Your Thoughts

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General Information

Director: James Sheldon

Writer: George Clayton Johnson

Cast: Dick York, June Dayton, Dan Tobin, Cyril Delevanti, Hayden Rorke, James Nolan, Frank London, Anthony Ray, and Patrick Waltz

Composer: None (Stock Music)

Air Date: 2/3/1961

Production Code: 173-3650

 

Overview

Having gained telepathic powers at the toss of a coin, bank clerk Hector B. Poole (Dick York) discovers that Mr. Smithers (Cyril Delevanti)—an old, the-twilight-zone-a-penny-for-your-thoughtstrustworthy, and unassuming employee—is thinking about stealing cash from the vault and escaping to Bermuda. At the behest of shy coworker Helen Turner (June Dayton), Hector informs the bank manager of Smithers’ ostensible plan, with an unexpected outcome.

“A Penny for Your Thoughts” makes refreshing use of an oft-employed trope (i.e. the mind is a terrible thing to read). Series enthusiasts are therefore advised to view this episode, which, for perhaps the first time in television history, details a potential drawback of telepathy.

 

Pros

Despite the simplicity of George Clayton Johnson’s narrative, “A Penny for Your Thoughts” will appeal to fans of science fiction with an ironic twist. Especially worth praising is the performance of Dick York, whose eccentric (albeit restrained) performancethe-twilight-zone-a-penny-for-your-thoughts works to highlight the comedic material in Johnson’s aforementioned narrative; notably, the aloof manner of York’s character comes across as unrealistic in light of his extraordinary talent, thereby resulting in a humorous contrast.

 

Cons

(Spoilers beyond this point)

By blackmailing his employer in order to receive a promotion, Hector fails to maintain his image of moral superiority.

 

Analysis

Operating on the premise that people rarely say what they mean and vice versa, “A Penny for Your Thoughts” should be commended for drawing attention to the absence of honesty, sincerity, and candidness in modern society. Specifically, Hector is metthe-twilight-zone-a-penny-for-your-thoughts with superficial praise from acquaintances and coworkers on a daily basis; upon developing telepathic abilities, however, the young bank teller finds out that such niceties serve only to cloak the unpleasant, if not thoroughly two-faced, intentions of those around him. Though played strictly for laughs, Hector’s life circumstances remind the audience that actions, not words alone, should be evaluated when assessing the character of a human being.

 

Concluding Comments

A cute and amusing episode, “A Penny for Your Thoughts” demonstrates why apparent motives should not always be taken at face value, regardless of how good or bad said motives may seem. Viewers of The Twilight Zone may thus enjoy this offering, the primary lesson of which compensates for a lack of substantive content.

 

Overall Quality: 8/10

 

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