Lost in Space Episode 83: Junkyard in Space

General Information

Director: Ezra Stone

Writer: Barney Slater

Cast: Guy Williams, June Lockhart, Mark Goddard, Marta Kristen, Billy Mumy, Angela Cartwright, Jonathan Harris, and Marcel Hillaire

Composer: Mullendore

Air Date: 3/6/1968

Production #: 1524



When the Robinsons land on a planet known as the Intergalactic Junkyard, Dr. Smith encounters an alien Junkman (Marcel Hillaire) and agrees to trade many of the Robot’s vital components for a supply of fresh food. Thereafter, the Junkman begins to assumelost-in-space-junkyard-in-space the Robot’s personality; but fails to develop the most important trait of all.

The final episode of Lost in Space, “Junkyard in Space” combines childish camp with a heartwarming story. Those of a sensitive nature may therefore wish to view this offering, which benefits from a poignant subplot involving Will and the Robot.



lost-in-space-junkyard-in-spaceDuring Will’s final moments with the Robot, Mullendore’s musical arrangement conveys the powerful sense of loss felt by the Robinson boy.



“Junkyard in Space” operates on a premise (i.e. Dr. Smith secretly dealing with an eccentric alien and exchanging the Robot for food) recycled from season one’s “The Space Trader,” an equally lackluster contribution from Barney Slater.



A touching episode, “Junkyard in Space” should be commended for exploring Will’s friendship with the Robot in a thoughtful, if occasionally sappy, manner. Specifically,lost-in-space-junkyard-in-space the unbreakable bond shared by Billy Mumy’s character and his mechanical companion is never depicted with greater solemnity than when Will—now moved to the point of tears by the prospect of his friend committing suicide—bids farewell to the Robot for supposedly the last time. (Nevertheless, the above display is cheapened—at least somewhat—by a silly, groan-worthy revelation concerning the Robot’s “heart.”)


Concluding Comments

Though grossly underwhelming as a series finale, “Junkyard in Space” is a decent standalone effort. It should be noted, however, that the Jupiter 2 winds up in a junkyard at the end of this episode—an ironic and fitting conclusion to the overall disappointing adventures of the Space Family Robinson.


Overall Quality: 5/10


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4 thoughts on “Lost in Space Episode 83: Junkyard in Space

  1. This is my number twenty-one ranked episode for the psychedelic and far out, all over the place, highly inconsistent and relatively overrated, shortest final colored season..

  2. A decent episode but the reviewer – in his comments about the Jupiter 2 deservedly ending up in a junkyard because of the overall disappointing adventures – seems to have forgotten that there were some truly great episodes which more than compensate for the weak efforts.

    • In my compilations of the Best, Worst, and Scariest Lost in Space episodes, I do acknowledge the truly exceptional offerings along with the weaker efforts. My primary criticism of this series is that it failed to maintain the serious, futuristic atmosphere of the early season one installments, instead adopting a more child-friendly tone throughout seasons two and three.

      Also, keep in mind that I was of a more critical mindset when I wrote my standalone reviews several years ago; today I might have chosen “uneven” rather than “disappointing” as a suitable adjective for describing Lost in Space.

      • Thank you for your reply. Even though I was only about 11 at the time I was disappointed with the way the series changed from adventure to fantasy and camp. However some of series 3 was very good with certain episodes vearing well away from being child friendly.

        Let’s hope the new Netflix series stays well on the side of adventure although I hope they manage to squeeze in some of the originals creative flair and hopefully John Williams’ fabulous music.